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The "construction" of the Greek landscape in the Hellenistic era: Ancient Messene
Filio Iliopoulou, Architect, Landscape Architect

The current article examines the way the Greek landscape was constructed –if at all- in the Hellenistic era, claiming that its design was based on certain architectural principles which reflect the political and social values of that historical period. The doctorate thesis of C. Doxiadis will provide the methodological tools for the theoretical analysis of these principles and this process will be informed constantly by the findings of the most thoroughly excavated town of that period, the ancient Messene.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

  • Alcock, S.E. 1993. “Graecia Capta: The Landscapes of Roman Greece”. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Doxiadis, C. A. 1972. “Architectural Space in Ancient Greece”. Cambridge: MIT Press.
  • Ucko P. and Layton R., « The archaeology and anthropology of landscape: shaping your landscape », in the One world archaeology, London: Routledge, 1999, Vol.30. pp. 104-110.

iliopoulou.filio@gmail.com

17/01/2013
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The methodology introduced by C. Doxiadis. Credit: Doxiadis, C. A. 1972. “Architectural Space in Ancient Greece”. Cambridge: MIT Press.
Ancient Messene. Credit: F. Iliopoulou
The view towards the Messenian Bay from the archaeological site.
Ancient Messene’s Hippodamian system.
Panoramic view of the archaeological site of ancient Messene.
The layout of public buildings in ancient Messene.
Panoramic view of the archaeological site of ancient Messene (digital model). Credit: F. Iliopoulou.
View of the public buildings and services in ancient Messene in relation to the city’s main axis. Credit: F. Iliopoulou